Where to Stream ‘Nomadland’ and Other Big Oscar Winners

Every single Oscar winner is available for home viewers to watch right now, including “Nomadland,” which won major prizes for best picture, best director and best actress, and has been streaming on Hulu for months. The big questions are where, how and how much: Some are exclusive to popular streaming services like Netflix, some are affordable rentals while a couple more recent releases are $19.99, and some can be streamed and bought but not rented while others can be rented but not bought. Sound confusing? The list of Oscar winners below will put you a click away from knowing all the options and discovering whether or not the Academy got it right.

Won for: Best picture, director and actress.

How to watch: Stream it on Hulu. Buy it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play, Vudu and YouTube.

In her follow-up to “The Rider,” the director Chloé Zhao again ventures into the harsh, beautiful world of the American West, where another maverick faces an uncertain future. Left jobless and houseless after a mine closure, Fern (Frances McDormand) is a widow living out of her van, roaming the country while picking up odd jobs. She finds a community of sorts in other modern-day “nomads” who have made a place for themselves in the open country, where the possibilities of true freedom are checked by the anxiety of a hand-to-mouth existence.

Won for: Best actor and adapted screenplay.

How to watch: Rent it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play, Vudu and YouTube.

Adapting his own stage play with the seasoned writer Christopher Hampton, Florian Zeller makes a confident directorial debut with this lacerating drama about dementia and its cascading effects in the life and mind of an isolated octogenarian. From the start, Anthony Hopkins plays him as a difficult character, alarming his daughter (Olivia Colman) with the awful mistreatment of his latest caretaker. But his grip over reality itself soon begins to loosen, too, turning “The Father” into a psychodrama generated from its lead character’s deteriorating sense of self and the compassionate efforts of those who try to intervene.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best supporting actor and song

How to watch: Rent it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play and Vudu.

As J. Edgar Hoover’s F.B.I. settles on seeing Black revolutionaries as the greatest internal threat to national security, the agency finds a ripe target in Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya), the fiery young leader of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party. Shaka King’s gripping historical drama details the effort to suppress his message, focusing on William O’Neal (Lakeith Stanfield), a car thief who’s directed by a field agent (Jesse Plemons) to infiltrate the Panthers and keep tabs on Hampton’s actions. What follows is a pitched battle for O’Neal’s soul and a vivid staging of Civil Rights history.

Won for: Best supporting actress.

How to watch: Rent it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play and Vudu.

Drawn from the writer-director Lee Isaac Chung’s own childhood experiences, this finely wrought drama starts with a Korean-American family moving to a plot of untilled land in rural Arkansas in the 1980s. With tensions already high between Jacob (Steven Yeun) and his wife, Monica (Yeri Han), who doesn’t share Jacob’s optimism over the farm’s potential to yield a fortune in Korean vegetables, the two struggle to settle into a place where language and cultural barriers are high. Their children are a worry, too, particularly a young son (Alan Kim) with a heart condition and no easy access to a hospital. As a grandmother visiting from Korea, Yuh-Jung Youn imports a loopy chaotic energy that breaks up (and occasionally exacerbates) the domestic tension.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best original screenplay.

How to watch: Rent it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play, Vudu and YouTube.

Bored barista by day, vengeful honey pot by night, Cassie (Carey Mulligan) feigns drunkenness in nightclubs and on dates as a way of trapping men eager to take advantage of vulnerable women. In her icy debut feature, the writer-director Emerald Fennell, who worked on the third season of “Killing Eve,” gradually digs into Cassie’s past as a med-school student, which ended abruptly after a traumatic incident. As she audaciously and methodically responds to this wrongdoing, Cassie enters into a relationship with a former classmate (Bo Burnham), but her experiences with predatory men makes it difficult for her to let down her guard.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best cinematography and production design.

How to watch: Stream it on Netflix.

Based on a screenplay by his late father Jack, David Fincher’s sumptuous evocation of Hollywood’s Golden Age is principally about Herman J. Mankiewicz (Gary Oldman) and the tortured process of writing “Citizen Kane” for Orson Welles. But “Mank” opens up into a much more expansive survey of the studio system, the media and the California political scene in the ’30s and early ’40s, which include run-ins with power brokers like the MGM boss Louis B. Mayer (Arliss Howard) and William Randolph Hearst (Charles Dance), the glowering inspiration for Charles Foster Kane. The movie also spends time with Hearst’s mistress Marion Davies (Amanda Seyfried), an actress trailed by scandal.

Won for: Best costume design and makeup and hairstyling.

How to watch: Stream it on Netflix.

As a gifted, swaggering, mercurial jazz trumpeter whose ambitions mask an anger and pain that simmers beneath the surface, Chadwick Boseman gives a performance for the ages in this tightly wound adaptation of August Wilson’s stage play. Set almost entirely during a recording session in Chicago in 1927, “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” works primarily as a showcase for actors like Boseman and Viola Davis, who stars as a demanding singer whose ensemble is laying down tracks for white producers. Tussles over the creative direction of the album lead to deeper conflicts over race and how much power even a revered Black artist can wield in white society.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best editing and sound.

How to watch: Stream it on Amazon Prime.

With all the visceral force of its hero’s occupation, Darius Marder’s drama chronicles the decline of Ruben (Riz Ahmed), a punk-metal drummer who starts to lose his hearing, which threatens not only his livelihood but also his tenuous grip on sobriety. When Ruben inevitably bottoms out, his bandmate and girlfriend, Lou (Olivia Cooke), cajoles him into joining a commune specifically for deaf addicts, run by a gentle but tough-minded Vietnam veteran (Paul Raci). Ruben’s impatience in accepting his condition leads him to seek cochlear implants, but there are unseen obstacles that threaten his recovery, his relationships and his long-term mental health.

Read the New York Times review.

Through the story of Joe Gardner (Jamie Foxx), a jazz pianist who dies and tries to negotiate a way back to New York to play the gig of his dreams, Pixar’s “Soul” makes a touching and sophisticated argument for the pleasures of life itself. As with previous work like “Monsters, Inc.” and “Inside Out,” the co-writer/director Pete Docter draws on a gift for abstract world-building to imagine an afterlife where souls are efficiently processed for new mortals. Gardner games the system with the help of an unassigned soul (Tina Fey) who joins him on a journey back to Earth, where they both learn something about what it means to be alive.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best international feature.

How to watch: Stream it on Hulu. Rent it on Amazon, Google Play, Vudu and YouTube.

Poised between a boozy campus comedy and a sobering reflection on midlife crises, Thomas Vinterberg’s lively Danish film stars Mads Mikkelsen as a high-school history teacher who’s barely going through the motions as an educator and a family man. The morning after a delightful, liquor-soaked dinner together, he and his three colleagues (Thomas Bo Larsen, Lars Ranthe and Magnus Millang) decide to embark on an experiment: If they all day-drink to a certain degree, perhaps the social lubricant will allow them to perform at a higher level. The experiment works swimmingly for a while, but the hangover inevitably sets in.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best documentary.

How to watch: Stream it on Netflix.

In the spirit of documentaries like “March of the Penguins,” which seek to find the connections between wild animals and human nature, “My Octopus Teacher” profiles Craig Foster, a free-diver who forged a relationship with a common octopus in a remote underwater kelp forest near Cape Town, South Africa. Foster decided to follow this same octopus every day, which led to a level of trust and understanding between man and sea creature that wouldn’t seem possible. Pippa Ehrlich and James Reed’s documentary shows Foster gaining insight into family, mortality and the fragility of the natural world. It’s not clear what the octopus got out of the deal.

Won for: Best visual effects.

How to watch: Rent it on Amazon, Apple TV, Google Play and Vudu.

It’s a brain-spraining exercise to wrap your mind around Christopher Nolan’s latest spectacle, which introduces the concept of “time inversion,” a process that allows actions from the future to infiltrate the present, like a fired bullet getting sucked back into the chamber. So it’s probably best to approach “Tenet” as a globe-hopping 007-style adventure starring John David Washington and Robert Pattinson as special agents assigned to stop a Russian arms dealer (Kenneth Branagh) from using time inversion to destroy the world in reverse. The forward/backward fight sequences are as elegantly choreographed as they are inexplicable.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best live-action short.

How to watch: Stream it on Netflix.

“Groundhog Day” meets the Black Lives Matter movement in this bluntly engineered short about Carter (Joey Bada$$), a Black graphic designer who gets harassed by the same police officer (Andrew Howard) over and over again as he’s trying to get home to walk his dog. With each time loop, Carter tries to finesse his way through the encounter, but he can never seem to get away alive, often getting killed in ways that mirror real-life deaths like Eric Garner’s or George Floyd’s. Having Bruce Hornsby’s “The Way It Is” serve as the short’s version of Sonny and Cher’s “I Got You Babe” makes the messaging here unmissable.

Read the New York Times review.

Won for: Best animated short.

How to watch: Stream it on Netflix.

Sketched in a simple, pencil-shaded black-and-white that breaks only for a critique of a country where such terrible things are possible, Will McCormack and Michael Govier’s short about the aftermath of a school shooting backs into the tragic event — and even then, only tentatively. Much of “If Anything Happens I Love You” deals with the emotional distance between two parents coping with the loss of their 10-year-old girl, with shadows often functioning as their thoughts made manifest.

Won for: Best documentary short.

How to watch: Stream it on YouTube.

For years, Colette Martin-Catherine, a former member of the French resistance, refused to cross into Germany and visit the Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp, where her brother, another resistance member, was killed by the Nazis. To her, concentration camps had become a form of “morbid tourism.” Though she changed her mind at 90, opting to make the trip with a compassionate young history student, she rejects any sentimentality Anthony Giacchino’s short might attach to her story. “Colette” may have the expected emotional pull, but her memories and observations have a thorniness that makes it feel more earned.

Read the New York Times review.

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